Runboard.com
You're welcome.

runboard.com       Sign up (learn about it) | Sign in (lost password?)

Page:  1  2 

 
Miz Robbie Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Head Administrator

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14135
Karma: 20 (+55/-35)
Reply | Quote
Scams


Definition: fraudulent scheme performed by a dishonest individual, group, or company in an attempt obtain money or something else of value. Scams traditionally resided in confidence tricks, where an individual would misrepresent themselves as someone with skill or authority, i.e. a doctor, lawyer, investor. After the internet became widely used, new forms of scams emerged such as lottery scams, scam baiting, email spoofing, phishing, or request for helps. These are considered to be email fraud. Also see phishing, scheme.

Read more: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/scam.html

*****

Given that scammers are becoming more clever and are increasingly able to access our personal information, we may need to offer examples in order to prevent becoming victims.

---
Robbie
10/14/2019, 10:12 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
Miz Robbie Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Head Administrator

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14135
Karma: 20 (+55/-35)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


Lawyer Shares How Scarily Advanced Phishing Scams Are Getting In Viral Twitter Thread

by Jennifer Still, Woke Sloth


Phishing scams are nothing new, but since everyone is getting wise to the methods criminals use to gain access to your bank accounts and other important financial accounts, those who perpetrate these crimes are having to get much more creative. In fact, they’re getting so good at coming up at new ways to steal your information and your money that a seasoned lawyer almost fell for it.

In a now-viral Twitter thread, attorney Pieter Gunst revealed that while he has been the target of these scams before, the most recent one, which he called “one of the most credible phishing attempt[s he] experienced to date,” caught him off guard and almost succeeded until he noticed one major red flag.

Gunst revealed that the caller asked if his card had been used in Florida, to which he said no. The scammers then claimed that they’d blocked the transaction in question but asked him his member number in order to confirm his identity. Gunst complied since knowing the number in and of itself poses no danger, and the thieves then asked for a verification pin that was supposedly texted to his phone by the bank.

Having actually received the pin, Gunst assumed the call was legitimate and read off the pin as requested. Soon after, the scammers asked him to confirm recent transactions on the account, which were all legitimate.

However, they raised Gunst’s suspicions when they asked him to reveal his pin so that they could block future fraudulent transactions. He refused, hung up on the scammers, and immediately called his bank to report the scam. He also filed a police report and reset all of his passwords.

So, how did the scammers manage to get so much of Gunst’s information? After much reflection, he revealed that he believes that they used his member number to reset his online banking password.

Once they were in, they were then able to view all of his transactions, making them seem more legitimate. However, they needed Gunst’s pin to wire money out of the account, and since he didn’t give it to them, they didn’t succeed.

Gunst’s followers were understandably shaken up at the advanced methods scammers are now using to steal our money, but many had humorous suggestions on how to deal with the problem, like keeping your account empty or just not answering your phone.

While it’s unnerving to know that criminals are getting more intelligent when it comes to phishing scams, we just need to be vigilant—and refuse to give out identifying information to people who claim to be bank representatives who call us unprompted.

https://wokesloth.com/advanced-phishing-scam-viral-twitter/jenniferstill/


---
Robbie
10/14/2019, 10:14 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
Miz Robbie Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Head Administrator

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14135
Karma: 20 (+55/-35)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


Posted on Facebook -- unable to verify.


NEW SCAM!

This is very clever. I would probably fall for it if not warned. Give this wide distribution. This scam is actually very clever. Just when you thought you'd heard it all. Be very careful out there! Beware of people bearing gifts!

The following is a recounting of the incident from the victim:

Wednesday a week ago, I had a phone call from someone saying that he was from some outfit called: "Express Couriers," (The name could be any courier company). He asked if I was going to be home because there was a package for me that required a signature.

The caller said that the delivery would arrive at my home in roughly an hour. Sure enough, about an hour later, a uniformed delivery man turned up with a beautiful basket of flowers and a bottle of wine. I was very surprised since there was no special occasion or holiday, and I certainly didn't expect anything like it. Intrigued, I inquired as to who the sender was.

The courier replied, "I don't know, I'm only delivering the package."

Apparently, a greeting card was being sent separately. (The card has never arrived!) There was also a consignment note with the gift.

He then went on to explain that because the gift contained alcohol, there was a $3.50 "delivery/ verification charge," providing proof that he had actually delivered the package to an adult (of legal drinking age), and not just left it on the doorstep where it could be stolen or taken by anyone, especially a minor.

This sounded logical and I offered to pay him cash. He then said that the delivery company required payment to be by credit or debit card only, so that everything is properly accounted for, and this would help in keeping a legal record of the transaction.

He added, "Couriers don't carry cash to avoid loss or likely targets for robbery."

My husband, who by this time was standing beside me, pulled out his credit card, and the "delivery man," asked him to swipe the card on a small mobile card machine with a small screen and keypad. Frank, my husband, was asked to enter his PIN number and a receipt was printed out. He was given a copy of the transaction.

The guy said everything was in order, and wished us good day.

To our horrible surprise, between Thursday and the following Monday, $4,000 had been charged/withdrawn from our credit/debit account at various ATM machines.

Apparently the "mobile credit card machine," which the deliveryman carried now had all the info necessary to create a "dummy" card with all our card details including the PIN number.

Upon finding out about the illegal transactions on our card, we immediately notified the bank which issued us a new card, and our credit/debit account was closed.

We also personally went to the police, where it was confirmed that it is definitely a scam because several households had been similarly hit.

WARNING: Be wary of accepting any "surprise gift or package," which you neither expected nor personally ordered, especially if it involves any kind of payment as a condition of receiving the gift or package. Also, never accept anything If you do not personally know or there is no proper identification of who the sender is.

Above all, the only time you should give out any personal credit/debit card information is when you yourself initiated the purchase or transaction!

PLEASE, pass this on, it may just prevent someone else from being swindled

MUST READ AND LET FAMILY AND FRIENDS KNOW!

---
Robbie
10/14/2019, 10:16 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
Miz Robbie Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Head Administrator

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14135
Karma: 20 (+55/-35)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


How Gift Card Scams Are Used to Finance Fraud

Difficult-to-trace funds make cards an easy choice for scammers

by Gary Weiss, AARP, June 12, 2019

When Denise McKendry entered the Kroger store in Midlothian, Va., on Feb. 25, the schoolteacher was visibly distraught. She was on her cellphone, talking to a man who had identified himself as Officer Johnson from the IRS. He had explained, in threatening and sometimes nasty terms, that McKendry owed $5,207 in back taxes and that she’d be arrested if she did not pay it off. Fortunately, thanks to an arrangement among Google, the IRS and her local police department, she could easily make a down payment on her debt and avoid jail. All she had to do was buy two $500 Google Play gift cards and read their code numbers to him over the phone.

But as McKendry, who is in her 50s, tried to buy the cards by check, the clerk at the customer service counter got suspicious: “Do you know where these are going? How they are going to be used?” After a pause, she nodded yes. “OK, good,” he replied, “because we get a lot of scams and they use these Google prepaid cards.” McKendry covered her phone so Officer Johnson wouldn’t hear. “Please help me,” she mouthed. She and the clerk went to the store manager, Tim Day, who explained that she was being scammed and had her hang up. The effort to separate McKendry from her money was over.

You may think of a gift card as the perfect birthday or graduation present for a relative who’d like to buy music, video games or clothing. But, as McKendry’s ordeal illustrates, gift cards have also become a popular payment mechanism among scam artists. Whether masquerading as IRS agents, tech-support personnel or the attorney for a grandchild who’s supposedly in jail, criminals pressure their targets to buy gift cards for iTunes, Google Play, Best Buy and other popular retailers — and order them to provide the code numbers, or PINs, on the back of the cards so they can be redeemed.

It’s a growing trend. Federal Trade Commission data show that 26 percent of scammers asked for gift cards and “reload cards” in 2018, versus just 7 percent in 2015.

The good news: As awareness of gift-card use in scams grows, so do the efforts to head off those scams. Part of that involves employee training. At Kroger Mid-Atlantic, for example, service-desk personnel are trained “to engage with customers to ensure they are not being scammed” and to refuse transactions if necessary, a spokeswoman says. Apple, Best Buy and Target also say they train employees to be on the lookout for people who may be buying gift cards while in the midst of being defrauded. “What we wanted to be able to do is have people recognize if they saw somebody in distress,” Todd Hartman, Best Buy General Counsel and Chief Risk & Compliance Officer, says.

Other measures include limits on the purchase and use of gift cards. Last year three major retailers — Best Buy, Target and Walmart — announced they were voluntarily implementing two such measures to reduce gift-card fraud. One was to lower the maximum amount of money that people could load on to gift cards in one transaction. The other was to put new restrictions on using their gift cards to buy other cards — a practice that scammers use to hide their tracks.

Last year, AARP collaborated with Best Buy and the National Association of Attorneys General to create a public service announcement warning people about gift-card schemes. One of the key messages: Gift cards are not used — and cannot be used — to pay bail, taxes or court fines.

“I was just so relieved,” McKendry says about the help she received at Kroger. “At that point the tears came. I gave Tim a hug, and I thanked Tim and his team, because they pretty much saved me from this scam.”

Back in the parking lot, sitting in her car, she got another phone call. It was Officer Johnson, and he was angry. “Don’t you call me again,” McKendry said. And this time, without any prompting, she hung up on him.

https://www.aarp.org/money/scams-fraud/info-2019/gift-card-fraud.html

---
Robbie
10/14/2019, 11:14 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
Miz Robbie Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Head Administrator

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14135
Karma: 20 (+55/-35)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


How to Protect Yourself From Telephone Scams

Remember these tips to avoid being a victim of a telephone scam:

Do

    *Register your phone number with the National Do Not Call Registry. You may register online or by calling 1-888-382-1222. If you still receive telemarketing calls after registering, there’s a good chance that the calls are scams.

    *Be wary of callers claiming that you’ve won a prize or vacation package.

    *Hang up on suspicious phone calls.

    *Be cautious of caller ID. Scammers can change the phone number that shows up on your caller ID screen. This is called “spoofing.”

    *Independently research business opportunities, charities, or travel packages being offered by the caller.

Don’t

    *Don’t give in to pressure to take immediate action.

    *Don’t say anything if a caller starts the call asking, “Can you hear me?” This is a common tactic for scammers to record you saying “yes.” Scammers record your “yes” response and use it as proof that you agreed to a purchase or credit card charge.

    *Don’t provide your credit card number, bank account information, or other personal information to a caller.

    *Don’t send money if a caller tells you to wire money or pay with a prepaid debit card.


Many more scams described: https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds#item-213707

---
Robbie
10/14/2019, 11:28 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
JustLis Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14888
Karma: 35 (+63/-28)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


Thanks for posting these, Robbie. The delivery man scam definitely would have caught me.

---
Lis

Just one voice.... Singing in the darkness....
10/14/2019, 11:51 am Link to this post PM JustLis
 
Miz Robbie Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Head Administrator

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14135
Karma: 20 (+55/-35)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


quote:

JustLis wrote:

Thanks for posting these, Robbie. The delivery man scam definitely would have caught me.



Me, too.

---
Robbie
10/14/2019, 12:09 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
bricklayer Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 3106
Karma: 8 (+14/-6)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


Good information, Robbie. Thank you for posting it.
10/14/2019, 12:43 pm Link to this post PM bricklayer
 
Bellelettres Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 11-2008
Posts: 9590
Karma: 21 (+38/-17)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


Wow! This needs to be shared widely.
10/14/2019, 12:57 pm Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
JustLis Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14888
Karma: 35 (+63/-28)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


What are the odds?

I opened the door to a flower delivery man. (My sister and her family sent flowers to Mom.)

He didn't have any wine, though. He said that had been directed to a Miz Robbie somewhere out west....

---
Lis

Just one voice.... Singing in the darkness....
10/14/2019, 2:06 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
Miz Robbie Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Head Administrator

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14135
Karma: 20 (+55/-35)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


Oh, goody! I'll be happy to turn over all my credit card information for some wine!

---
Robbie
10/14/2019, 2:28 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
JustLis Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14888
Karma: 35 (+63/-28)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


LOL!

The one that ALMOST got my mom was a young man who called her and just said, "Grandma?"

Of course, her first instinct was to respond, "Andrew?"

And then they had a name.... Wanted money for bail, of course. Don't tell Mom or Dad.

She really thought it WAS Andrew, but told him she wasn't about to hide anything from Brett and me. She told him to call me and hung up.

She avoided the scam by just being a wonderful grandma!

---
Lis

Just one voice.... Singing in the darkness....
10/14/2019, 3:03 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
MsSusieQueue Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 2642
Karma: 2 (+8/-6)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


quote:

Miz Robbie wrote:

quote:

JustLis wrote:

Thanks for posting these, Robbie. The delivery man scam definitely would have caught me.



Me, too.



Me, too. Especially if the delivery included wine, since I get several deliveries of wine every year from small wineries in CA that I love and that do not sell their wines retail outside of CA.
10/14/2019, 5:54 pm Link to this post PM MsSusieQueue
 
MsSusieQueue Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 2642
Karma: 2 (+8/-6)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


quote:

Miz Robbie wrote:

Oh, goody! I'll be happy to turn over all my credit card information for some wine!



Robbie, I promise to email you ahead of time if I'm ever sending another delivery of wine. emoticon
10/14/2019, 5:56 pm Link to this post PM MsSusieQueue
 
Miz Robbie Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Head Administrator

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14135
Karma: 20 (+55/-35)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


We seem to be having a Rumpus Room conversation in the Scams thread.

I deleted them.

Last edited by Miz Robbie, 10/15/2019, 12:55 pm


---
Robbie
10/15/2019, 12:48 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
MsSusieQueue Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 2642
Karma: 2 (+8/-6)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


quote:

Miz Robbie wrote:

We seem to be having a Rumpus Room conversation in the Scams thread.

I deleted them.



Sorry about that.
10/15/2019, 12:57 pm Link to this post PM MsSusieQueue
 
Miz Robbie Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Head Administrator

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14135
Karma: 20 (+55/-35)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


Unbelievably, I still get the occasional call from somebody with a heavy south Asian accent who says his name is Brian, or Gary, or Jason, and claims to be calling from Microsoft to tell me there's a problem with my computer but if I follow his instructions he can fix it.

I can't believe anyone still bites on this one.

---
Robbie
10/22/2019, 12:01 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
JustLis Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14888
Karma: 35 (+63/-28)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


What FINALLY stopped them for me is that I screamed at the top of my lungs into the receiver. emoticon

---
Lis

Just one voice.... Singing in the darkness....
10/22/2019, 7:22 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
Miz Robbie Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Head Administrator

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 14135
Karma: 20 (+55/-35)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


quote:

JustLis wrote:

What FINALLY stopped them for me is that I screamed at the top of my lungs into the receiver. emoticon



Hmmmm... I'll try that. Thanks!

---
Robbie
10/22/2019, 7:35 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
Birdz Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 08-2017
Posts: 2547
Karma: 0 (+8/-8)
Reply | Quote
Re: Scams


One red flag for email phishing scams is when your name is not on the message. If you have an account with a bank, or PayPal, or Apple, etc., and they contact you by email about anything, your name will be somewhere in the message. The recent phishing attempt to me, purportedly from “Apple Support,” with whom I have an account, had no name on the message. Ditto for a previous phishing email scam from “PayPal,” with whom I have an account.

The same holds for telephone scams. There’s no name mentioned.
10/22/2019, 7:47 pm Link to this post PM Birdz
 


Add a reply

Page:  1  2 





You are not logged in (login)
Back To Top