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Re: Quickies


It's Irma coverage they were letting people read for free, Lis. Are you blocked from that?
9/11/2017, 2:25 pm Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Quickies


Yes. I just tried to follow the link you left in your last post, and after initially showing up on the correct page, it entirely whited out in favor of an ad saying I have to pay if I want to read it.

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Just one voice.... Singing in the darkness....
9/11/2017, 2:30 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
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(]CNN)On Monday, the 16th anniversary of 9/11, a Fox News commentator wondered if a memorial for victims of the terrorist attack might eventually meet the same fate as statues depicting Confederate generals.

In an interview with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, "Fox & Friends" co-host Brian Kilmeade alluded to a memorial for passengers of United Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, where Zinke was slated to speak.

"Do you worry that 100 years from now someone is going to take that memorial down like they are trying remake our memorials today?" Kilmeade asked, referring to the recent controversies that have led to the removal of statues for Confederate military leaders like Robert E. Lee.

"I'm one that believes we should learn from history and I think our monuments are part of our country's history," Zinke replied. "We can learn from it. Since we don't put up statues of Jesus, everyone is going to fall morally short. And I think reflecting on our history, both good and bad, is a powerful statement and part of our DNA. So I'm an advocate of, again, learning from our monuments, understanding the period they were made. But also, we live in a great country and monuments are not Republican, Democrat, independent. The monuments are a tribute to all of us."


Filth. We do NOT build a monument to every moment in history. We build monuments to CELEBRATE people and events. When Martin Luther King was assassinated, did we erect a monument to James Earl Ray? After 9/11, did we erect a monument to the terrorists? No. And gee, most of us remember that history just fine without a monument.

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Just one voice.... Singing in the darkness....
9/11/2017, 2:48 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
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Re: Quickies


Since we don't put up statues of Jesus, everyone is going to fall morally short.

What?
9/11/2017, 3:50 pm Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Has single-payer's time come?


The dam is breaking on Democrats’ embrace of single-payer

By Aaron Blake September 11 at 3:50 PM

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) became the fourth co-sponsor of Sen. Bernie Sanders's (I-Vt.) “Medicare for all” health-care bill Monday. In doing so, he joined Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.).

What do those four senators have in common? Well, they just happen to constitute four of the eight most likely 2020 Democratic presidential nominees, according to the handy list I put out Friday. And another senator in my top 8, Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), last month came out in favor of the idea of “Medicare for all” — though not this specific bill (yet).

This is about as far from a coincidence as you can get. And it suggests the dam is breaking when it comes to the Democratic Party embracing government-run health care, also known as single-payer.

There are 48 members of the Democratic caucus in the Senate. That four of the first five to come out in support of Sanders's bill all came from a relatively small universe of top presidential hopefuls suggests that this will be a litmus test issue in 2020. And any hopeful that doesn't support it is going to stand out like a sore thumb. (The fifth was Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, and Oregon's Jeff Merkley joined the growing group shortly after Booker on Monday afternoon. Merkley and Whitehouse have also been mentioned as dark-horse 2020 hopefuls.)

Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) said last week that Congress should take a “solid look” at single-payer. Activists hailed even those cautious words given Tester represents a red state and has previously been dismissive of the idea that single-payer's time has come.

And polls certainly suggest its time has come — at least on the left. I argued back in July that the biggest winner of the Obamacare repeal debate was single-payer. And polls have repeatedly shown an increase in support for both single-payer and the idea that government should guarantee health care, even among Republicans.

A Pew poll in January showed 60 percent of Americans said the government had a responsibility to provide health-care coverage for all, up from 51 percent the year before. The poll showed just 33 percent overall favored single-payer specifically — versus a “mix of government and private programs” — but among Democrats and Democratic-leaning voters, 52 percent wanted single-payer. And among self-described liberals, it was 64 percent.

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Last edited by Bellelettres, 9/11/2017, 4:53 pm
9/11/2017, 4:52 pm Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Quickies


Even "Medicare for all" isn't a pure single-payer plan. Medicare covers about 80% of doctors and hospitals, and doesn't cover drugs at all. One must buy a Medicare Advantage Plan (or something similar) from one of the insurance companies to get better doctor and hospital coverage, and to get any drug coverage at all.

But this would certainly be a vast improvement over what we have now.

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9/11/2017, 5:22 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Re: Quickies


I wish I had saved the link to a funny photo I saw.

You know how people often spray paint humorous messages on the plywood that they cover their windows with before a hurricane?

Well, someone with a warped sense of humor spray painted a message with an arrow and something like, "Irma, North Korea's that way!"
9/11/2017, 10:05 pm Link to this post PM Birdz
 
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Messages to Irma


Here you go, Birdz:

'Hey Irma, North Korea is that way': Defiant Floridians write hilarious messages on the boarded windows of their evacuated homes and businesses

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9/12/2017, 5:19 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Quickies


The one I liked was "Lotters will be shot on site". LMAO!!
9/12/2017, 10:43 am Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Re: Messages to Irma


quote:

Bellelettres wrote:

Here you go, Birdz:

'Hey Irma, North Korea is that way': Defiant Floridians write hilarious messages on the boarded windows of their evacuated homes and businesses

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Internet stuff gets hyped as "hilarious" or "side splitting" or "the funniest thing ever" when they're usually just mildly amusing. These were mildly amusing.

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9/12/2017, 11:02 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Senate to vote on Rand Paul's war proposal.


quote:

The Senate will weigh in on Sen. Rand Paul's push to sunset two war authorizations, a vote that follows the Kentucky Republican's threat to grind an annual defense bill to a standstill.

Senators will hold a vote on Paul's amendment to sunset the 2001 and 2002 Authorizations for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) on Wednesday.

Paul wants to attach a six-month sunset of the two war bills to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). The 2001 AUMF passed in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks, while the 2002 AUMF authorized the Iraq War.

The move comes after Paul said on Monday that he would slow-walk the Senate's consideration of the NDAA — an annual bill that normally passes with large, bipartisan margins — and block any other of the hundreds of amendments from getting votes.

Paul's amendment is unlikely to get added to the Senate's defense bill.

Senators on both sides of the aisle have been pushing for years for Congress to hold a vote on if they should sunset the 2001 or 2002 war authorizations, or pass a new AUMF to fight the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

But deep policy and political divisions have repeatedly stymied congressional efforts.

However, Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), one of the Senate's most vocal proponents of a new war authorization, said on Tuesday that he would support Paul's push.

"I am supporting Senator Paul's amendment. I think it is way past time—way past time—for Congress to take this up and for everybody to be on the record. I think our allies need to know whether Congress supports the American military missions currently under way," Kaine said.

Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) is also expected to support it.



]Source.

It's past time that the Congress asserted it's constitutional authority concerning the use of our military by Presidents who will go off playing "whack a mole" when it suits their desires or they need some political warm and fuzzies.
9/12/2017, 5:52 pm Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Re: Senate to vote on Rand Paul's war proposal.


I couldn't agree more, Cooter.
9/12/2017, 6:02 pm Link to this post PM bricklayer
 
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Liberals in a tizzy over statues.


quote:

Many blacks and their white liberal allies demand the removal of statues of Confederate generals and the Confederate battle flag, and they are working up steam to destroy the images of Gens. Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee and President Jefferson Davis from Stone Mountain in Georgia. Allow me to speculate as to the whys of this statue removal craze, which we might call statucide.

To understand it, we need a review of the promises black and white liberals have been making for decades. In 1940, the black poverty rate was 87 percent. By 1960, it had fallen to 47 percent. During that interval, blacks were politically impotent. There were no anti-poverty programs or affirmative action programs. Nonetheless, this poverty reduction exceeded that in any other 20-year interval. But the black leadership argued that more was necessary. They said that broad advancement could not be made unless blacks gained political power.

Fifty years ago, there were fewer than 1,000 black elected officials nationwide. According to the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, by 2011 there were roughly 10,500 black elected officials, not to mention a black president. But what were the fruits of greater political power?

The greatest black poverty, poorest education, highest crime rates and greatest family instability are in cities such as Detroit, St. Louis, Oakland, Memphis, Birmingham, Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Buffalo. The most common characteristic of these predominantly black cities is that for decades, all of them have been run by Democratic and presumably liberal politicians. Plus, in most cases, blacks have been mayors, chiefs of police, school superintendents and principals and have dominated city councils.

During the 1960s, black and white liberals called for more money to be spent on anti-poverty programs. Since the Lyndon Johnson administration's War on Poverty programs, U.S. taxpayers have forked over $22 trillion for anti-poverty programs. Adjusted for inflation, that's three times the cost of all U.S. military wars since the American Revolution.

Despite that spending, the socio-economic condition for many blacks has worsened. In 1940, 86 percent of black children were born inside marriage, and the black illegitimacy rate was about 15 percent. Today, only 35 percent of black children are born inside marriage, and the illegitimacy rate hovers around 75 percent.

The visions of black civil rights leaders and their white liberal allies didn't quite pan out. Greater political power and massive anti-poverty spending produced little. The failure of political power and the failure of massive welfare spending to produce nirvana led to the expectation that if only there were a black president, everything would become better for blacks.

I cannot think of a single black socio-economic statistic that improved during the two terms of the Barack Obama administration. Some have become tragically worse, such as the black homicide victimization rate. For example, on average in Chicago, one person is shot every two hours, 15 minutes, and a person is murdered every 12 1/2 hours.

So more political power hasn't worked.
Massive poverty spending hasn't worked.
Electing a black president hasn't worked.
What should black leaders and their white liberal allies now turn their attention to in order to improve the socio-economic condition for blacks?

It appears to be nearly unanimous that attention should be turned to the removal of Confederate statues. It's not only Confederate statue removal but Confederate names of schools and streets. Even the Council on American-Islamic Relations agrees. It just passed a resolution calling for the removal of all Confederate memorials, flags, street names and symbols from public spaces and property.

By the way, does the statue of Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman qualify for removal? He once explained his reluctance to enlist former slaves, writing, "I am honest in my belief that it is not fair to our men to count negroes as equals ... (but) is not a negro as good as a white man to stop a bullet?" It's difficult to determine where this purging of the nation's history should end.



Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University.

]Source.

This was in my state newspaper, but for some reason or another I wasn't about to get it online. Fortunately it was in a lot of other places.

My "theory" is that improving not only race relations but the economic status of the general population is up to each of us as individuals. Passing laws has done little if anything. Treating each other as we would like to have them treat us would solve a lot of problems.
9/12/2017, 7:25 pm Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Re: Quickies


Human beings seem hardwired to have an us and a them, and if those divisions aren't immediately obvious we'll create them.

A Jewish joke says that if there were only two Jews in the world we'd need three synagogues: one for you, one for me, and one for both of us to boycott.

We seem to congregate in packs.

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9/12/2017, 9:01 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Re: Quickies


There has been some needed legislation passed. Civil Rights Act of '64 and the Voting Rights Act of '65. Unfortunately GOP state governments have been trying to legalize voter suppression.
9/13/2017, 12:06 am Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Re: Quickies


I wonder how reliable Williams's figures are. For instance, he says, "In 1940, 86 percent of black children were born inside marriage, and the black illegitimacy rate was about 15 percent. Today, only 35 percent of black children are born inside marriage, and the illegitimacy rate hovers around 75 percent." 86 and 15 are pretty close to 100 percent, but if 35 percent of black children are born inside marriage, how can around 75 percent of them be illegitimate?

I'll address voter suppression in the next post.
9/13/2017, 5:23 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Quickies


Gorsuch bodes ill.

Over liberals’ objections, Supreme Court says Texas need not draw new districts now

By Robert Barnes September 12 at 9:49 PM

Over the objections of four liberal justices, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday night that Texas does not immediately have to redraw electoral districts that a lower court found diminished the influence of minority voters.

The 5-to-4 ruling almost surely means the 2018 midterm elections will be conducted in the disputed congressional and legislative districts.

The justices gave no reasons in their one-paragraph statement granting a request from Texas that it not be forced to draw new districts until the Supreme Court reviewed the lower court’s decision.

But the court’s liberals — Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen G. Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan — signaled their unhappiness by noting they would not have agreed to Texas’s request.

The court’s intervention was a victory for Texas Republicans, who had drawn the districts. It disappointed civil rights groups, who had noted that even though growth in the state’s Hispanic population was the reason for additional congressional seats, none were drawn to favor minority candidates.

The decision was yet another indication of the influence of President Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court, Justice Neil M. Gorsuch, who joined the court in April. Without a full complement of five conservative justices, the court likely would have tied 4 to 4, and Texas’s request for a stay would have failed.

The state has been in the midst of an extraordinary losing streak in federal courts over the way it conducts elections.

Over the latter part of the summer, federal judges in four separate cases ruled that the Texas Legislature discriminated against minorities in drawing congressional and legislative districts, setting ID requirements for voters and even regulating who can assist voters whose first language is not English.

Two courts are considering whether the actions were intended to discourage African American and Hispanic voters. If the courts find that the efforts were intentional, it could return Texas to the kind of federal oversight from which the Supreme Court freed it and other mostly Southern states in the
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R) called the rulings “outrageous” and “astonishing.”

A lower court overseeing the redistricting cases called for a special session of the Texas Legislature to redraw the electoral lines. But Paxton went quickly to the Supreme Court, saying it would be a waste of time if the Supreme Court ultimately agreed with Texas that the districts did not have to be redrawn.

The decision by a three-judge panel ordering new districts “is not just wrong, but egregiously so,” Paxton told the court in a brief.

Without a special session or a court redrawing the legislative and congressional district lines, it would seem impossible to have the new districts in place in time for the 2018 elections. Redrawn districts probably would have increased the chances for Democrats and minorities to capture them.

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9/13/2017, 5:25 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Quickies


"Diminished the influence of minority voters". That reminds me of their "not being able to elect a candidate of their choice".

I know that Texas has and will gerrymander districts to ensure GOP majorities so that the white folks can run things to their satisfaction. I've just always felt that there were better language that the attorneys and politicians could have used.

I also don't find Sotomayer to be that liberal. Neither is Breyer, necessarily. The other two are.

This actually seems to me that the court is going to let things stay until they have a chance to review the case. It's no hint on how they might rule, and with Roberts, anything is possible.
9/13/2017, 10:43 am Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Ryan: Deporting Dreamers 'not in our nation's interest'.


This Congress has a lot of people confused. LOL!!

quote:

Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) said deporting recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) was “not in our nation’s interest” and believes Congress could reach a legislative fix.

"I do believe that kicking these 800,000 kids out to countries that they have probably not been to since they were toddlers, countries that speak languages that they may not even know, is not in our nation's interest," Ryan said in a wide-ranging AP Newsmakers interview Wednesday.

Ryan discussed immigration at length. But while he declined to discuss details of a deal, he hinted a fix with border security measures could get through Congress.

"I don't want to negotiate through the media," he added.

Ryan is meeting this afternoon with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) and the leaders of the Hispanic, Black and Asian American and Pacific Islander Caucuses to discuss DACA.

The Obama-era program provides relief for immigrants brought to the country illegally as children.

President Trump rescinded the program last week, but gave Congress six months to figure out a legislative solution for 690,000 undocumented immigrants who could soon lose their work permits and deferral from deportation.

Ryan said Trump "made the right call" in giving Congress a six-month deadline to find a solution.

"I wanted him to give us time, I didn't want it to be rescinded on day one and create chaos. But he was right in that President Obama was wrong in basically using legislative powers that he did not possess," said Ryan.

"What we asked the White House is to give us some time, so we could come up with the right consensus and compromise to fix this problem," he added.

Ryan stressed that any deal with Democrats to make DACA benefits permanent would have to include border security measures.

"I do believe there's got to be a solution to this problem, but at the same time I think it's only reasonable, it makes perfect common sense, that we deal with the problem that was the root cause of this, which is we do not have operational control of our borders," said Ryan.

Ryan added that a border wall, Trump’s signature campaign issue, should be part of the solution.

Democrats have vowed to do everything in their power to block wall funding.

"I think a wall actually works," said Ryan. "The reason I say that is because I went down to the Rio Grande and the Border Patrol themselves told me that there are certain spaces where we actually need a physical barrier."

He added a wall would not need to cover the entire length of the border.

"There are circumstances on the ground that should dictate how we do border security but doing border security should not be a negotiable thing, we should have security over our borders."

Beyond DACA, Ryan said, the country needs to fix a "broken immigration system."

He warned, however, that a comprehensive immigration bill was unrealistic, and "fall under its own weight."

"I think we just need to make progress in immigration just for the sake of the country. Put aside politics, this is a broken system that needs to be fixed," he said.

"I actually like the idea of moving to a merit-based immigration system for the economy's needs. I think that makes a lot of sense," Ryan continued.

He mentioned the Raise Act, proposed by Republican Sens. Tom Cotton (Ark.) and David Perdue (Ga.), but said he disagreed with its sharp reduction in legal immigration.

"The numbers are what I have an issue with. But the idea of going to a skills-based point system, which a lot of countries do, I think there's a lot of merit to that idea," said Ryan.

Ryan said the economy, with workforce shortages and an aging population, would need an influx of labor to maintain growth.



]Source.
I agree that we simply cannot deport these kids. There has to be a way to allow them to stay here. After that, immigration in toto needs to be addressed. I don't disagree with a skills point system. We should at least discuss whether or not to have some sort of emergency plan for people caught up in internal warfare, etc.

We've got citizens in this country that we need to kick out, but that's another issue.

[sign in to see URL] Congress continues to surprise me. Maybe there's a little hope.
9/13/2017, 12:10 pm Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Re: Quickies


There is a Supreme Court thread and and a DACA thread.

Please look around.

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9/13/2017, 12:15 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 


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