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Obama team’s 2020 signals spark chatter among Dems


Here we go.

quote:

Democrats are expressing concern that advisers and aides to former President Obama have already begun signaling which candidate they might support for the White House in 2020.

Valerie Jarrett, one of Obama’s closest confidantes, and David Simas, the CEO of Obama’s foundation, have sent smoke signals urging former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick (D) to enter the race.

Simas, who once served as a top aide to Patrick, is an ardent supporter of the former governor, sources tell The Hill, while Jarrett has privately told friends that she would do what it takes to support him.

And Politico reported last month that Jarrett believes a President Patrick is “what my heart desires.”

At the same time, friends of Jarrett’s say that while she would love for Patrick to run, she is also open to other candidates.

Others in Obamaworld have quietly been buzzing about the excitement behind a potential Patrick run.

Axios's Mike Allen mentioned Patrick as a favorite in Obamaworld in his popular newsletter on Friday.

Other former aides close to Obama say they would support a run by former Vice President Joe Biden, if he decides to launch a bid in 2020.

Obama has not weighed in publicly on the next presidential race, and those around him have said he isn’t looking to tip the scales and believes it is too early to back any one candidate.



]Read more here.

Good comment on the track record of Party insiders. I don't see anyone mentioned that warms my cockles, and the idea of carrying on the Obama legacy doesn't appeal to me. It may be time to write in my ex-wife again in 2020.
9/3/2017, 9:50 am Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Skeezy bastard



Trump has decided to end DACA, with 6-month delay

Senior White House aides met Sunday afternoon to discuss how to roll out the controversial move affecting hundreds of thousands of Dreamers.

By ELIANA JOHNSON 09/03/2017 08:21 PM EDT Updated 09/03/2017 08:25 PM EDT


President Donald Trump has decided to end the Obama-era program that grants work permits to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country as children, according to two sources familiar with his thinking. Senior White House aides huddled Sunday afternoon to discuss the rollout of a decision likely to ignite a political firestorm — and fulfill one of the president’s core campaign promises.

Trump has wrestled for months with whether to do away with the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. He has faced strong warnings from members of his own party not to scrap the program and struggled with his own misgivings about targeting minors for deportation.

Conversations with Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who argued that Congress — rather than the executive branch — is responsible for writing immigration law, helped persuade the president to terminate the program, the two sources said, though White House aides caution that — as with everything in the Trump White House — nothing is set in stone until an official announcement has been made.

In a nod to reservations held by many lawmakers, the White House plans to delay the enforcement of the president’s decision for six months, giving Congress a window to act, according to one White House official. But a senior White House aide said that chief of staff John Kelly, who has been running the West Wing policy process on the issue, “thinks Congress should’ve gotten its act together a lot longer ago.”

Trump is expected to announce his decision on Tuesday, and the White House informed House Speaker Paul Ryan of the president’s decision on Sunday morning, according to a source close to the administration. Ryan had said during a radio interview on Friday that he didn’t think the president should terminate DACA, and that Congress should act on the issue.

Neither the White House not a spokesman for Ryan immediately responded to requests for comment.
The president’s expected announcement is likely to shore up his base, which rallied behind his broader campaign message about the importance of enforcing the country’s immigration laws and securing the border. At the same time, the president’s decision is likely to be one of the most contentious of his early administration, opposed by leaders of both parties and by the political establishment more broadly.

The White House and Congress have tried to pass the issue off on each other – with each arguing that the other is responsible for determining the fate of the approximately 800,000 undocumented immigrants who are benefiting from DACA. Though most Republicans believe that rolling back DACA is a solid legal decision, they are conscious of the difficult emotional terrain. Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch joined Ryan in cautioning Trump against rolling back the program.

The president is likely to couch his decision in legalese. Many on the right, even those who support protections for children brought into the country illegally through no fault of their own, argue that DACA is unconstitutional because former President Barack Obama carried it out unilaterally instead of working through Congress.

Some Republican lawmakers, including Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, have said that Congress needs to pass a law to protect the so-called Dreamers.

“My hope is that as part of this process we can work on a way to deal with this issue and solve it through legislation, which is the right way to do it and the constitutional way to do it,” Rubio told CNN in June.
Trump’s expected decision to scrap DACA represents another challenge for Ryan and fellow congressional Republicans, who are facing an end-of-September deadline to avert a government shutdown and government debt default, while also tackling a Hurricane Harvey relief package and a major tax reform push.

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9/3/2017, 8:30 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Re: Quickies


I agree that the Congress should get off of its rear end and address this among a number or other things.
9/3/2017, 10:25 pm Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Re: Quickies


quote:

CooterBrown44 wrote:

I agree that the Congress should get off of its rear end and address this among a number or other things.



Yes, they should. Now, watch the Freedom Party throw tantrums.

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9/3/2017, 10:41 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Who started Labor Day?


Go, union!

Who started Labor Day? The bloody and confusing history of an American holiday.

By Rachel Siegel September 4 at 6:00 AM

The act making Labor Day a federal holiday spared few words when it was signed into law on June 28, 1894. Above the scripted signatures of President Grover Cleveland, the speaker of the House and the vice president, the 83-word law declared that the first Monday of September be “the day celebrated and known as Labor’s Holiday.”

The paragraph does little to suggest the decades of confusion that would swirl around the holiday’s origins, Cleveland’s role in its creation or the blood spilled along the way. Labor leaders with similar names spawned much debate as to who was the holiday’s true founder, and the caretaker of the nation’s leading Cleveland museum insists that the president’s signing of the law was not the politically motivated gesture widely reported ever since.

The first Labor Day celebrations took place more than a decade before it became a federal holiday. Many sources point to Peter J. McGuire — founder of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America and an early leader of the American Federation of Labor — who suggested the celebration to the Central Labor Union of New York as the holiday’s progenitor. Others claim that Matthew Maguire, secretary of the Central Labor Union, proposed the holiday.

On Sept. 5, 1882, the first parade launched in lower Manhattan. A band played “When I First Put This Uniform On,” from “Patience,” a comic opera by Gilbert and Sullivan. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the total number of marchers ranged from 10,000 to 20,000. The New York Tribune reported that “the windows and roofs and even the lamp posts and awning frames were occupied by persons anxious to get a good view of the first parade in New York of workingmen of all trades united in one organization.” Nearly 25,000 union members and their families celebrated in a post-parade party at Wendel’s Elm Park at 92nd Street and 9th Avenue.

From 1887 to 1894, 23 states passed Labor Day laws. Oregon was the first, followed by Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York. Then came its recognition as a federal holiday.

The passage of Labor Day legislation was not a priority of Cleveland’s presidency, said Sharon Farrell, caretaker of the Grover Cleveland Birthplace in Caldwell, N.J. Rather, legislation had already been making its way through Congress and did not hinge on Cleveland’s final signature, she said.

“He was not the driving force behind it, and it was not his idea,” Farrell said. “He just happened to be the president sitting in the chair.”

Farrell’s argument challenges a widely held belief that Cleveland rushed the legislation through in the midst of one of his presidency’s most fraught moments: the Pullman Strike. In an essay titled “The Government in the Chicago Strike of 1894,” Cleveland wrote that a “very determined and ugly labor disturbance broke out in the city of Chicago.”

“Almost in a night it grew to full proportions of malevolence and danger,” he wrote. “Rioting and violence were its early accompaniments; and it spread so swiftly that within a few days it had reached nearly the entire Western and Southwestern sections of our county.”

The railroad strike and boycott lasted May 11 to July 20, 1894, disrupting rail traffic for much of that summer. In response to the economic depression that began in 1893, the Pullman Palace Car Company, which manufactured railroad cars, cut the wages of its workers 25 percent. A group of workers tried to address their grievances with company president George M. Pullman, but he refused to meet with them and ordered them fired. A delegation of workers then voted to strike, marching out of work on May 11.

Thirty-five percent of Pullman workers were represented by the American Railway Union at the time of the strike. The workers believed the union would back the strike, but it wasn’t clear exactly how, because the Pullman workers did not directly work on the railroads.

The union ultimately refused to handle Pullman cars or trains with Pullman cars until the railroads cut ties with the Pullman Company. Union president and future Socialist presidential candidate Eugene V. Debs knew that the support of switchmen would be key to the boycott’s success: If switchmen stopped adding or removing Pullman cars from trains, the railroads would replace them with nonunion workers and prompt more union members to walk out.

By the end of June, 125,000 workers on 29 railroads quit rather than handle Pullman cars. But Debs worried about the potential for the workers’ anger to lead to violence. As he predicted, a crowd following a June 29 speech acted out, setting buildings on fire and derailing a locomotive that was attached to a U.S. mail train.

Cleveland — who had also received reports of goods rotting in rail yards and cattle dying from the heat — was not pleased.
Illinois Gov. John Peter Altgeld had already dispatched militia companies to quell rioting. U.S. Attorney General Richard Olney urged federal troops go into Chicago to stop the “reign of terror.” On July 2, he obtained an injunction that barred union leaders from compelling employees of the railroads “to refuse or fail to perform any of their duties.”

Cleveland ordered troops into Chicago on July 3, much to the frustration of Altgeld, who thought his state militias had a handle on the situation. Strikers acted out against the troops, overturning rail cars and erecting barricades at the rail yards. On July 6, roughly 6,000 rioters destroyed hundreds of rail cars in the South Chicago Panhandle yards.
But even the 6,000 federal and state troops, 3,100 police officers and 5,000 deputy marshals in Chicago could not suppress the violence. National Guardsmen fired into a mob July 7, killing as many as 30 people and wounding others. Gradually the strike ended and trains resumed their normal schedules, and federal troops were pulled out July 20.

Historians, encyclopedias and news articles pinpoint Cleveland’s actions during the Pullman Strike as his reason for rushing the Labor Day Act through Congress that June. People were dead on the streets of Chicago, and the creation of a holiday would help make up for it. These reports also claim the law was passed to court votes ahead of the 1896 election, to no avail. In this version of history, Cleveland was rejected by his party, and the Democratic nomination went to the great orator William Jennings Bryan. Republican William McKinley ultimately won the presidency.

But Farrell, the Cleveland expert and museum caretaker, said the law’s timing was not politically motivated. Cleveland, who had already served two terms, had no intention of running for reelection, she said. She called the alleged connection between Labor Day and Cleveland’s political future “completely misguided.”

After Cleveland signed the law, the Morning Call of Paterson, N.J., published an editorial titled “Honor to Whom Honor is Due,” according to the New Jersey Historical Society. The piece argued that Matthew Maguire was the undisputed founder of the holiday.

More than a century later, it seems the question of “to whom honor is due” is still up for debate.

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9/4/2017, 7:46 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Quickies


September 4, 2017 / 2:25 AM / 4 hours ago

UK's Prince William and wife Kate expecting third child

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain’s Prince William and his wife Kate are expecting their third child, their office said on Monday after the Duchess was forced to cancel an engagement due to severe morning sickness.

The baby will be fifth in line to the British throne, after grandfather Prince Charles, father William and elder siblings George, 4, and Charlotte, 2.

The couple, who released the news via their office at Kensington Palace, did not say when the baby was due.

“The Queen and members of both families are delighted with the news,” the palace said.

Britain’s monarchy has ridden a wave of public support in recent years due to the emergence of the younger royals, William, Kate and William’s brother Harry.

Kate and William married in a lavish ceremony in 2011 watched by about two billion people around the world. Two years later the international camera crews and photographers camped outside a London hospital to record the birth of George, and returned two years later for his sister Charlotte.

George and Charlotte have since appeared on the front covers of magazines around the world and traveled on official royal tours of Poland and Germany with their parents.

“This is fantastic news,” British Prime Minister Theresa May said. “Many congratulations to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.”

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9/4/2017, 10:02 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Re: Quickies


I don't blame William for having plenty of kids. emoticon
9/4/2017, 10:10 am Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Re: Quickies


Do you all think the monarchy should be abolished? Of what value is it to England now that Shakespeare is not writing plays for Elizabeth?
9/4/2017, 10:14 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Quickies


I think it is utterly none of my business whether the UK should keep the monarchy. They seem to like it.

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9/4/2017, 10:17 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Re: Quickies


A poll of Britons in 2015 showed that 71 percent support the monarchy and 18 think there should be an elected head of state. This is interesting, because 68 percent think the monarchy is good for Britain, and 9 percent think it is bad, with 17 percent saying it is neither good nor bad. (So some of that 17 percent support it anyway?)

62 percent think the monarchy will still be there in 100 years, and 23 percent think it won't.

The monarchy certainly gives Britons (the whole world for that matter) something to gossip about, the way our movie stars do for us and the whole world. When I was a child, I had pictures of Elizabeth and Margaret, the little princesses, and pictures of the Dionne quintuplets. Are any of you old enough to reember the Dionne quintuplets? I wonder where they are now.

American women fell in love with Philip when he was courting Elizabeth. (He turned out to be a womanizer, according to Paul Theroux.) What American woman didn't want Margaret to marry Captain Townsend, even though he was divorced. Does anyone remember how our feathers fell when she announced that she wouldn't marry him?
9/4/2017, 11:02 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Quickies


The Brits can do whatever floats their boats. I'll be happy when they're happy.
9/4/2017, 11:18 am Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Do we need more statues of women?


What is your favorite statue of a woman. I like Lady Liberty and the Spirit of Justice in the Great Hall of the U.S. Justice Department. Do you remember when John Ashcroft had the Spirit of Justice draped because one of her breasts is bare?

Here's a story about statues of women in general, and the number we have compared to the number of statues of men.

Why We Should Put Women on Pedestals

By JULIA BAIRDSEPT. 4, 2017

It’s a perilous time to be a statue.
Not that it has ever been a particularly secure occupation, exposed as statues are to the elements, bird droppings and political winds.

Just ask Queen Victoria, whose rounded frame perches atop hundreds of plinths across the Commonwealth, with an air of solemn, severe solidity. But in 1963 in Quebec, members of a separatist paramilitary group stuck dynamite under the dress of her local statue.

It exploded with a force so great that her head was found 100 yards away. As Leonard Cohen put it in his novel “Beautiful Losers,” the explosives were placed “on her metal lap.” Which is a bit rude for a queen.

Today, the head is on display in a museum, with her body preserved in a room some miles away — separated by a radical anticolonialism the curators want us to remember. The art historian Vincent Giguère told The Globe and Mail, “The fact it’s damaged is what makes it so important.”

History is messy and contested and shifting. It is also usually written by men, about men.

There’s another reason to conserve the beheaded Victoria. Statues of women, standing alone and demanding attention in a public space, are extremely rare.

To be made a statue, a woman had to be a naked muse, royalty or the mother of God. Or occasionally, an icon of war, justice or virtue: Boadicea in her chariot in London, the Statue of Liberty in New York, “The Motherland Calls” in Volgograd.

Still, of 925 public statues in Britain, only 158 are women standing on their own. Of those, 110 are allegorical or mythical, and 29 are of Queen Victoria, according to a study of British public monuments by Caroline Criado-Perez. Just 25 are statues of historical women who are not royalty, she writes, “one of whom is a ghost and only there because she’s looking for the spirit of her murdered husband.”

There are 43 statues of men named John.
In the United States, less than 8 percent of public statues are female. Nine of 411 national parks are dedicated to women’s history. Which is why women have been stealthily gathering funds to break through the “bronze ceiling” and place statues of women in busy public spaces.

A campaign begun in February called Put Her on the Map aims to “encourage cities and corporations to put women on the map by naming streets, statues and buildings after influential female figures.” In Manchester, England, where Queen Victoria is the sole female figure out of 17 statues, the Womanchester Statue Project has been gathering funds for a statue of the suffragist Emmeline Pankhurst.

Monumental Women is raising money for a statue of suffragists in Central Park in New York. And a new app, The Whole Story, uses augmented reality technology to place female statues in public spaces everywhere from Washington to Milan, Prague and Rome.

Why does this matter? Because history is skewed. Because women have been rendered invisible and irrelevant for centuries. Because when little girls walk past imposing figures on pedestals, they know they represent status and authority, that this person has done or been something worthwhile.

And if women are on those pedestals, they will know women can matter and make history. Or simply that women are history.

One thing I like most about Victoria’s statues is that she did not pose coquettishly or aim to please the eye. She stood with authority. The primary concern of the woman Leonard Cohen called “the mean governess of the huge pink maps” was not whether people liked her but whether she liked them.

This monarch, who eschewed corsets and shocked doctors with her frankness about her body, was simply powerful. She loved to surround herself with beauty, most especially her husband’s, but she did not give a fig about her own.

Which is lucky, because her sculptors did not flatter her. When, in 1919, the Arts Gazette asked readers to nominate the ugliest statue in London, George Bernard Shaw thought there were several of Victoria that could qualify. He asked “what crime Queen Victoria committed that she should be so horribly guyed as she has been through the length and breadth of her dominions.

It was part of her personal quality that she was a tiny woman, and our national passion for telling lies in every public subject has led to her being represented as an overgrown monster.” The truth, he said, was that Victoria “was a little woman with great decision of manner and a beautiful speaking voice which she used in public extremely well.” Instead, “All young people now believe that she was a huge heap of a woman.”

Heap or not, she could not be ignored. Which surely is the most obvious upside of visibility.

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9/4/2017, 11:33 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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The Twinkie Defense, Updated


Aspiring Pastor Accused of Killing Wife in His Sleep Blames Cold Medicine: ‘I Can’t Believe I Did This’

By Char Adams Posted on September 4, 2017 at 1:00pm EDT

A 28-year-old North Carolina man is facing a murder charge after allegedly stabbing his wife in bed — but the newlywed claims he doesn’t remember carrying out the alleged crime because he might have done it in his sleep, PEOPLE confirms.

Matthew Phelps, of Raleigh, called police distraught early Friday morning, declaring that his wife, Lauren, was dead on their bedroom floor covered in blood.

“I had a dream and then I turned on the lights and she’s dead on the floor,” he says in a 911 call obtained by PEOPLE. “I have blood all over me and there’s a bloody knife on the bed and I think I did it. I can’t believe this.”

He told the dispatcher through tears that his wife wasn’t breathing and that he was afraid to get close to her — “I’m so scared,” he said.

Phelps is charged with murder and is being held at Wake County Detention Center without bail, a jail spokesperson tells PEOPLE. As police work to determine the circumstances around Lauren’s death, Phelps suggested during the 911 call that cold medicine he took the night before might have led to his alleged actions.

“I took more medicine than I should have,” he said. “I took Coricidin Cough and Cold because I know it can make you feel good. A lot of times I can’t sleep at night. So, I took some.”

He added: “Oh my God. She didn’t deserve this.”

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9/4/2017, 1:43 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Re: Quickies


He's either legally insane, or insane to think that a jury is going to buy this one.
9/4/2017, 1:48 pm Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Was Freud a Fraud?


I remember being mesmerized by Freud. He's a good writer. Decades later I read Geoffrey Masson's denunciation of Freud and was struck by his conclusion that everyone who had been psychoanalyzed since 1901 ought to be recalled, like the Pinto. Here's a review of a new book about Freud, telling us more about his personality. It's interesting that this book would come out at this particular time.

Young Freud, cruel, incurious, deceptive, and in search of fame

September 1

Matthew Hutson [who wrote this review] is a science writer and the author of “The 7 Laws of Magical Thinking.”

Mention Freud and you’ll get some strong reactions. He’s known as a spelunker of the human soul, responsible for uncovering such veins of frisson as denial and projection, but also for questionable or damaging contributions such as penis envy and the Oedipus complex.
 
An informal poll of my peers I recently conducted on Facebook revealed his mixed reputation. One respondent said: “Brilliant and interesting philosopher of mind.” Another: “Gut response, mostly wrong about everything.” There was this accolade: “I don’t think you can look at the field of psychology without seeing him as a giant.” And this attack: “A horrible misogynist.” . . . Oh, and this: “Plus he was a real drug user, which is fun.”

In a new biography, “Freud: The Making of an Illusion,” Frederick Crews depicts his subject as cruel, incurious, deceptive, and both fragile and vainglorious. Crews focuses on Freud’s early career, from 1884 to 1900, and the picture that emerges is of a trumped-up blowhard.
Freud’s life has been digested and redigested for decades, but Crews, an English professor and former psychoanalysis advocate, takes on this period because he says it’s been overlooked except by proselytizing partisans who distort the record. Plus, the complete set of Freud’s letters from this period to his fiance, Martha Bernays, has recently been released.
The driving force of the narrative is Freud’s yearning to become famous — for anything. In school, he was keenest on philosophy and entered medicine not out of interest or aptitude but for a living. His first stab at notoriety came with a useless cell-staining method he overhyped in scientific papers Crews describes as “crass propaganda.”

Next he turned to cocaine, which he expounded as a cure-all (and habitually injected). Freud tried to treat his friend’s morphine addiction with cocaine, rendering him doubly addicted, then fraudulently championed the fiasco as a string of successes with multiple patients. He even sold fake data to a cocaine manufacturer and pseudonymously published an academic article praising his own work.
 
Freud’s engagement with psychotherapy began in 1885 on an extended visit to a Parisian hospital. There he witnessed the treatment of “hysteria,” a grab bag of physical and psychological symptoms thought to be psychogenic — and distinctly feminine — and he took note of hypnosis as a method of inquiry. Essentially, the staff would knowingly or unknowingly induce women to act out, and punish them if they didn’t, using sedatives or clitoral cauterization. Apparently, Freud liked what he saw. He returned to Vienna and opened up shop.
Far from a passive listener, he insisted that patients had been sexually abused as children, and if they failed to recall anything, he would describe the episodes in detail. Many patients went away fuming — or laughing.

Freud’s claims skirted falsifiability, the quality of being testable, a bedrock of the scientific method. Resistance to his lurid suggestions, he argued, meant only that he was onto something; heads I win, tails you really do want to fellate your father. He also conspired to excommunicate any analyst from the movement who dared to subject his ideas to critical scrutiny. As Freud wrote to a close colleague, he was only “fantasizing, interpreting, and guessing” toward “bold but beautiful revelations.” He claimed: “I am actually not at all a man of science, not an observer, not an experimenter, not a thinker. I am by temperament nothing but a conquistador.”
As a result, he made claims about humanity based not on the evidence his patients presented but on hunches about his own hang-ups. He was apparently ashamed of his bisexuality, his masturbation and his molestation of his sister.

His ideas about sex and gender curdled his marriage to Martha. In letters, he called her unskilled, unpretty and deficient in personality. She asked for “a little respect.” He wrote, “If I have become unbearable recently, just ask yourself what made me so.” He tried to turn her against her mother, brother and friends — his rivals. After she bore him six children, he invited her sister to move in. Crews says Freud and his sister-in-law became secret lovers (she nearly died aborting his child), and he treated his wife as a maid and nanny.

Freud was not only a misogynist but also a misanthrope. He wrote a colleague: “I have found little that is ‘good’ about human beings on the whole. In my experience, most of them are trash.” He especially looked down on his patients. He told one colleague: “Patients only serve to provide us with a livelihood and material to learn from. We certainly cannot help them.” He surprised another colleague with this about his patients: “I could throttle every one of them.” The families of his (usually rich) clients called him a con man.

So Freud failed to help people, but his ideas have lasted, right? Turns out, for the most part they weren’t even his. He took the words “the unconscious” and “psychoanalysis” from his rival Pierre Janet’s “subconscious” and “psychological analysis,” describing ideas that go back much further. Throughout his career, Freud reliably rode his mentors’ coattails, then stabbed them in the back when they could carry him no further, publicly deriding them or erasing them from history.

One might wonder, then, about the origin of his appeal. His reputation comes not despite his profligate scholarship but because of it. He trumpeted his failures as successes, turned wild speculation into sweeping proclamation and, starting with 1899’s “The Interpretation of Dreams,” produced what Crews calls “detective fiction” rather than clinical reports. Crews writes: “Freud would truly be breaking new ground in the ‘Interpretation,’ not as a scientist but as a literary artist.” Freud was a fan of Sherlock Holmes mysteries, and Crews notes that a later case study provided an “invitation to the reader to share in forensic work that was both intellectually and sexually thrilling.”

In spreading word about the unconscious, despite offering some harmful ideas about it — calling gays perverts, masturbators evil and women conniving — did Freud incidentally help humanity? Crews doesn’t spend much time on legacy, except to suggest that Freud’s distraction from real scientific and therapeutic work set psychology and neuroscience back by decades.

The book can be rough going in some places, through no fault of the dedicated author. Rather the source material eschews penetrability and plausibility; Freud’s accounts became so tangled over the years as he avoided admitting error that I fear there’s no untangling them. Even so, “Freud” is a surprisingly fun read, as Crews gets in plenty of sharp jabs. He seems to find the most damning way to spin any admission or incident, leaving one to wonder about his own interpretive filters. Still, given the facts presented, it’s hard to imagine additional disclosures that would completely reverse the overall impression.
 
The notion of Freud as a great explorer, albeit with a wonky compass, persists. He’s shorthand for buried memories and impulses. Perhaps we’d be better off if his own buried treasure had stayed buried. Sometimes a fallacy is just a fallacy.

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9/4/2017, 2:35 pm Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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18th charity pulls event from Trump's Mar-a-Lago after Charlottesville


quote:

An 18th charity has pulled its event from President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate since his controversial remarks on the violence in Charlottesville, Va., last month.

The Palm Beach Habilitation Center will no longer hold its annual Hab-a-Hearts luncheon at the president’s property in Palm Beach, Fla., the Palm Beach Daily News reported Sunday.

“We’ve decided to move because we want to keep the focus of the event on our mission, which is to help adults with physical or mental challenges live the best lives possible,” the group's CEO David Lin told the Daily News.

The local charity becomes the latest in a long list of charities that have pulled their events from Trump’s estate since his remarks on the violence at the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville last month, in which he blamed “both sides” for the violence.

“What about the alt-left that came charging at the — as you say, the alt-right?” Trump asked. “Do they have any semblance of guilt? What about the fact they came charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs? Do they have any problem? I think they do. As far as I am concerned, that was a horrible, horrible day.”

Twenty-four charities in total have pulled their events from the estate so far this year, according to the Daily News, including major nonprofits like the American Red Cross, The Salvation Army and Susan G. Komen Foundation.



]Source.

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9/4/2017, 10:33 pm Link to this post PM CooterBrown44
 
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Re: 18th charity pulls event from Trump's Mar-a-Lago after Charlottesville


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:

18th charity pulls event from Trump's Mar-a-Lago after Charlottesville




Good for them. Good for all of them.

Last edited by Miz Robbie, 9/4/2017, 10:52 pm


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9/4/2017, 10:52 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Magazines about the 21st-century South


There are lots of links to these magazines in the story at the website. I'm going to look at some of them. The South puts fire in the liberal mind.

In Southern Magazines, Easy Pleasures and Hard Questions

By RICHARD FAUSSETSEPT. 5, 2017

DECATUR, Ga. — It was Friday afternoon at Kimball House, a casually elegant bistro set in a 19th-century railroad depot where the bartenders wield Herbsaint, rye and peach honey. Chuck Reece, 56, editor in chief of the website The Bitter Southerner, was at the bar, poring over the day’s raw oyster menu and using a little pencil to circle all the items of Southern provenance.

Then Mr. Reece recounted his website’s origin story, one he suffuses with a dash of the providential. It was originally going to be a breezy celebration of Southern cocktail culture, he said, until he and his friends hit on that curious name. “Bitter Southerner” suggested a more ambitious mission. “We basically spent a year trying to figure out what that name was telling us to do,” he said.
And this, in essence, is what they heard: “Cross out the ‘i’ and add an ‘e’,” Mr. Reece said. “Bitter” would become “better.” This website was going to try to fix the South.

From the outside, the American South of 2017 may seem stuck in a one-note loop of grim historical disputation, with fights over the Confederate flag and monuments interrupted only by meteorological disaster. But Mr. Reece’s online magazine is engaged in a broader re-examination of Southern identity that is playing out in a clutch of ambitious regional publications, some of them provocatively named — Garden & Gun, Scalawag — and all describing a multifaceted, multiracial future that seems to have already arrived, right alongside the incessant re-litigating of the past.

In the last four years, The Bitter Southerner has emerged, on a shoestring budget, as a kind of kitchen-sink New Yorker for the region. It has tackled issues of race, class, crime and capital punishment, and published profiles of Southern farmers, bartenders, beekeepers, gay teenagers, spiritualists and civil rights pioneers. Begun as a hobby, the web-only magazine now has 100,000 visitors per month, a small staff and a cult readership that supports its journalism with the purchase of T-shirts that broadcast Mr. Reece’s vision of inclusiveness (“All Y’all”) and the good life (“Drink More Whiskey”).

Along the way, it is trying to manage a tension that has long dogged Southern publications: How much to sing the song of the South, especially amid genuine evidence of racial progress, and how much to be a skeptical voice in a place where issues of race and class often shadow conversations about even the most innocent pleasures?

At one end of this spectrum is the Charleston-based Garden & Gun, a gauzy, 365,000-circulation lifestyle magazine that defines and reflects the new Southern aspirational style: Dowdy suburbanism is out, replaced by a vision of vernacular architecture, artisanal everything, the wabi-sabi chic of the rural hunting lodge and an informed embrace of regional cooking. Kimball House, with its vintage sconces and heart pine floors culled from a Kentucky distillery, has been featured in the magazine at least twice.

After nearly going under during the recession, Garden & Gun’s bimonthly issues are now fat, thanks to the humming economy and the avoidance of a list of topics, once enumerated by the editor in chief, David DiBenedetto, that might offend its readers: “politics, religion and SEC football.” (Don’t hold them to the last one.) Its aversion to controversy has, oddly, made it the South’s most controversial magazine, criticized by some Southern liberals who contend that it trots out a stylish, sanitized version of the moonlight-and-magnolias myth — even though its vision of the new Southern good life makes room for same-sex garden party hosts, contemporary African-American novelists and inventive Mexican-American chefs.

On the other end of the spectrum is Scalawag, a Durham, N.C., based nonprofit quarterly begun in 2015 by a three 20-somethings, with an unapologetic left-wing agenda and dispatches from self-identified queer Appalachia, gentrifying East Nashville and North Carolina’s death row. Its circulation is about 1,500, and it does not review cocktail bars. Its motto: “Reckoning With the South.”

“The South is not this homogeneous place — it has a deep history, a really full history, and one that’s not just for the upper class,” said Alysia Nicole Harris, 29, an African-American who grew up in Virginia and is an editor in chief of Scalawag. “The demographics are changing. And ultimately, we believe that the South is going to be the voice that emerges to lead this conversation about trauma and healing, because here is where the trauma was the thickest.”

Somewhere in the middle is The Oxford American, the venerable literary journal, less overtly polemical than Scalawag, but more apt to tackle the hard questions than Garden & Gun, in part by publishing some of the region’s best black authors. Here one finds the poet Nikky Finney spinning a “radical libretto” of slavery days and beyond; the cultural critic Zandria F. Robinson measuring the distance, in memoir, between Memphis and the Mississippi Delta; the novelist Kiese Laymon describing how the Atlanta hip-hop duo OutKast shaped his art.

The reigning commercial queen of the region continues to be Southern Living, that anodyne, 51-year-old war horse with the best cheese-straw recipes, and an audited circulation of 2.8 million. It has left the grappling-with-the-South lane open, and The Bitter Southerner, Scalawag and The Oxford American have filled it, responding to the deadly racial violence in Charlottesville, Va., with a mix of probing essays on history and politics, and first-person reporting from the streets. The Bitter Southerner also weighed in with a not-so-bitter take on the flooding in Houston.

(Continued)
9/5/2017, 6:14 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Magazines about the 21st-century South, part II


The most compelling contribution of the Atlanta-based Bitter Southerner may be the voice of Mr. Reece, the kind of 21st-century Southerner not always heard beyond the confines of the place. His is a white voice, simultaneously proud and conscience-stricken, screaming to be heard over the stock-car roar but always cognizant that there are other voices, in other flavors, that may deserve a hearing even more.

“If you are a person who buys the states’ rights argument … or you fly the rebel flag in your front yard … or you still think women look really nice in hoop skirts, we politely suggest you find other amusements on the web. The Bitter Southerner is not for you,” Mr. Reece wrote when the site began publishing in August 2013. “The Bitter Southerner is for the rest of us. It is about the South that the rest of us know: the one we live in today and the one we hope to create in the future.”

He knows his own publication has a way to go. The founders, a half-decade ago, were all white. Mr. Reece recently recruited a black managing editor, Timothy Turner, and a black music columnist, Joycelyn Wilson, a media studies professor at Georgia Tech. One of her most recent pieces, riffing on the latest 2 Chainz album, was titled “Four Reasons Pretty Girls Like Trap Music.”

When I returned to the South three years ago to work as a correspondent for The New York Times, The Bitter Southerner was gaining some buzz, but I was leery. Mr. Reece has written that his site exists “to support anyone who yearns to claim their Southern identity proudly and without shame,” and I suppose I think of my Southern identity as something less to claim than to puzzle out. The summer 2017 issue of The Oxford American features an essay by Harrison Scott Key, in which he describes his experience of playing in a Southern R&B band as a kid. I played in one, too. Apparently we shared the same small epiphany:

“We played for friends here and there, and we sounded O.K. — but something was missing,” Mr. Key wrote. “On the outside, we were white, but on the inside, we were also white. And inside that inner whiteness, there existed a deeper shade of white that knew things, such as how our good fortunes had come pretty easy, at least compared to the people we sang about in the songs we played.”

But I like Mr. Reece’s magazine, which, like any great periodical, feels like it is of its moment. At Kimball House, Mr. Reece held forth on a range of Southern topics both frivolous and deep: The introduction of okra as a cheap New World food supply for enslaved Africans. (“You can’t write a story about how wonderful a thing gumbo is without acknowledging that it is an undeserved gift.”) The mixology skills of New Orleans bartenders. (“There are old bars where folks never stopped doing it right.”) His interview with the Atlanta rapper Killer Mike (“He said, ‘I’m not that different from people you call redneck. I drive a truck. I like to fish.’”) And Southern millennials, born into a world where correctives to the Lost Cause myth are only a couple of clicks away.

They are an important part, he said, of The Bitter Southerner’s target audience.
“We have ancestors, recent ancestors, who grew up a certain way, and never challenged that way of thinking,” he said. “Now we’ve got all of these kids who have all of the world’s information at their fingertips. And they have the courage” — Mr. Reece used a more earthy phrase here — “to challenge it.”

Mr. Reece grew up in tiny Ellijay, Ga., in the Appalachian foothills, raising hogs with the Future Farmers of America and working in a record store for credit that he spent on punk rock records.

In 1979, he attended the University of Georgia, in Athens, where new cultural currents were percolating in a Southern context. He took in both the early music of [sign in to see URL]. and the art of Howard Finster, the rural Georgia preacher whose self-taught painting was full of otherworldly vision. Backwoods preaching was the kind of thing Mr. Reece thought he had moved to Athens to escape. Now he discovered the wonder in what he had shunned.

These days, The Bitter Southerner is his only full time job — a labor of love, he says, but one that pays a small fraction of his old work in corporate communications. In the early 1990s, Mr. Reece served as press secretary for Gov. Zell Miller, the Georgia Democrat best remembered for railing against his own party at the 2004 Republican convention.

The publication’s challenge is to reflect a modern South that has one foot in the craft cocktail lounge and one in the racial violence of Charlottesville, a reflection of what Patterson Hood, the leader of the Southern alternative rock band Drive-By Truckers, calls “the duality of the Southern thing.”

At a recent meeting, the magazine’s staff, including the media director, Kyle Tibbs Jones, mentioned two recent articles that had been popular among readers: a feature on Decoration Day, a Southern grave-tending ritual with echoes of Mexico’s Day of the Dead; and one that unearthed a trove of old photos of South Louisiana residents posing next to their beloved azalea bushes.

They spoke of the articles to come. Mr. Reece said they might run something on the novelist Thomas Dixon Jr., whose writings inspired the racist 1915 silent film “The Birth of a Nation,” and celebrated the white backlash that brought an end to Reconstruction.

“Basically a lot of what you see becoming manifest in alt-right philosophy today has antecedents in Dixon’s writing,” Mr. Reece said.

“Dark week,” Ms. Tibbs Jones said. “We need to follow that up with some azaleas.”

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9/5/2017, 6:15 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Quickies


Belle, have you noticed we don't post entire long articles and stories here? We get the important paragraphs that make whatever point we're wanting to emphasize, then add the link so that folks can see the entire story. This is just way too much.

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9/5/2017, 9:32 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 


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