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MsSusieQueue Profile
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Re: Coronavirus


quote:

JustLis wrote:

I hope it won't, too, Brick. But flu season starts just five or six weeks away, and so many of our states have STILL not bent the curve. I'm so disappointed to hear Europe's numbers are going back up again.... They worked SO hard to do everything right, but reopening brings risks....



As you may know, we had planned to go to Greece next month with both sons and their wives. That's all dust in the winds, now. Greece had one of the lowest COVID rates in the EU up until now, but their rates have spiked recently due to young people on the "party islands."

8/24/2020, 8:18 pm Link to this post PM MsSusieQueue
 
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Re: Coronavirus


My sister and I had talked about ditching our husbands for two weeks and going on an Alaskan cruise. Not for now.
8/25/2020, 3:36 pm Link to this post PM Birdz
 
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Re: Coronavirus


I've done the Alaskan Inner Passage cruise on Princess twice. Only cruises I've ever taken. They were absolutely wonderful. But no, not right now.

I'm sorry you two missed out on your cruise hopes, too.

---
Lis

Just one voice.... Singing in the darkness....
8/25/2020, 3:53 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
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Re: Coronavirus


(CNN) - Covid-19 superspreading event in Boston may have led to 20,000 cases, researcher says

One superspreading event may be connected to about 20,000 Covid-19 cases in the Boston area, a researcher said on Tuesday.

That event, a biotech conference attended by 200 people in late February, is now well known as a source of Covid-19 spread very early on in the pandemic.

"Ultimately, more than 90 cases were diagnosed in people associated with this conference or their contacts, raising suspicion that a superspreading event had occurred there," the researchers wrote in their study.



Ironically enough, my new sister-in-law, a PhD Nurse in the Boston area, is in the third phase of a vaccine test. Of course she doesn't know if she has the vaccine or the placebo. But I'm glad we're that far along.

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Lis

Just one voice.... Singing in the darkness....
8/25/2020, 10:40 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
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Re: Coronavirus


(CNN) - Don't argue with anti-maskers, CDC warns stores

When in doubt, don't argue with anti-maskers.

That's the recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to retail and service employees.

This week, the health agency issued new guidance to limit workplace violence that could be aimed at workers when enforcing their companies' Covid-19 safety procedures.

The procedures that retail and service businesses have been advised to implement under CDC guidelines include enforcing mask wearing, social distancing and limiting the number of customers allowed in a business at one time.

But the CDC warns that workers could be threatened or assaulted for employing these safety measures, describing violence ranging from yelling and swearing to slapping and choking the employees. The CDC has outlined a number of steps businesses can take, which include conflict-resolution training for their workers, installing security systems and identifying designated safe areas in stores employees can go to if they feel in danger.

One of the agency's biggest suggestions: "Don't argue with a customer if they make threats or become violent," the CDC says.



Disgusting that the decent people of this country have to take a back seat to the ignorant spreaders.

---
Lis

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8/25/2020, 10:44 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
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Re: Coronavirus


I recommend mace.
8/26/2020, 8:37 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Coronavirus


(CNN) - CDC was pressured 'from the top down' to change coronavirus testing guidance, official says

A sudden change in federal guidelines on coronavirus testing came this week as a result of pressure from the upper ranks of the Trump administration, a federal health official close to the process tells CNN.

"It's coming from the top down," the official said of the new directive from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The new guidelines raise the bar on who should get tested, advising that some people without symptoms probably don't need it -- even if they've been in close contact with an infected person.

Previously, the CDC said viral testing was appropriate for people with recent or suspected exposure, even if they were asymptomatic....

HHS has not specified what change in "current evidence" may have driven the change. Giroir is expected to address these issues at a briefing Wednesday afternoon.

But the new directive also lines up with a trend in policy and rhetoric from the White House. President Donald Trump has repeatedly suggested the US should do less testing.


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Lis

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8/26/2020, 1:29 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
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Re: Coronavirus


(CNN) - Experts feared the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally could be a superspreading event. More than 70 coronavirus cases are already linked to it

More than 70 Covid-19 cases have now been linked to an event that drew thousands of tourists to a small South Dakota city earlier this month, CNN surveys of state health departments show.

The annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally is a 10-day event that usually brings about 500,00 people to the city. This year, the rally attracted attendees on more than 460,000 vehicles, according to the state's transportation department.

Experts feared the rally, which drew people from all over the United States -- including coronavirus hotspots -- had the potential to become to become a spreading event, not just in the state but across the country.

Sixty-one percent of counties in the US have been visited by someone who was at Sturgis, Camber Systems, which collects and analyzes cell phone activity for health researchers, told CNN.



And how many more infected people are back in their hometowns, without anyone realizing those sick people were at the event?

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Lis

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8/26/2020, 1:32 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
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Re: Coronavirus


(CNN) - Covid-19 child cases in the US have increased by 21% since early August, new data shows

More than 70,000 new Covid-19 cases in children have been reported across the US since early August, new data shows.

Child cases increased by 21% between August 6 and August 20, according to an updated joint report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children's Hospital Association. More than 440,000 children have been infected in the US since the start of the pandemic, the report said.

Despite the climbing numbers, severe illness in children from the virus is rare, the report said. But updated guidance from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report posted earlier this month notes the rate of hospitalizations among children is increasing.

Of those hospitalized with the virus, about one in three children is admitted to intensive care -- the same as adults.



I have to give kudos to our school district. When we reopened, I only gave us 2-3 weeks at best before we would have to shut down. But we have only had a few cases, and the students who spent time near them were quarantined. We're still rolling....

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Lis

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8/26/2020, 1:56 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
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Re: Coronavirus


(CNN) - Some Ohio Republicans are trying to impeach the state's GOP governor over coronavirus

In the first months of the nation's ongoing fight against the coronavirus, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine emerged as one of the politicians who actually got it. As in: Understood the threat and took clear and decisive actions -- including being the first governor to close a state's schools to deal with the spread of the virus.

The praise those moves won DeWine nationally was reflected in his standing in the state, too. In a late June Quinnipiac University poll, 75% of Ohioans approved of how DeWine was handling his job -- including 81%(!) of Democrats, 76% of independents and 74% of Republicans.

In short: if there was a governor you would think would be immune from an impeachment attempt, it would be DeWine.

Or not.

"Articles of impeachment drawn up against Gov. Mike DeWine over coronavirus order," read the headline in the Cleveland Plain-Dealer earlier this week. The facts are these: A handful of conservative state lawmakers have filed an impeachment resolution that alleges, among other things, that a) DeWine allowed the state's health department overly broad leeway to issue Covid-19 guidelines b) "conspired" with the Ohio secretary of state to delay the March 17 primary and c) forced businesses to close, which led to a major economic slowdown in the state.

State Rep. John Becker, the leader of the impeachment effort, insisted to the Plain-Dealer that he was not simply trying to score political points or draw media attention with the impeachment gambit. "If this was (about) a matter of principle and people hearing my voice, I'd send out a letter to the editor, or maybe a House resolution," he said. "No -- impeachment is the intention."

Whatever the intention, the impeachment of DeWine is extremely unlikely. First, a majority of lawmakers in the state House would have to support it. Then, two-thirds of the state Senate, which is also Republican-controlled, would also have to approve. There's no indication that party leadership will even entertain the notion. House Speaker Bob Cupp said he would not back the impeachment effort, dismissing it as an "imprudent attempt to escalate important policy disagreements with the governor into a state constitutional crisis."

But whether DeWine actually has to worry about being impeached -- he doesn't -- is sort of beside the point here. What matters is that DeWine's handling of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, which has won him plaudits from coast to coast, has so angered a part of the Republican base in his state that a trio of lawmakers from his own party have decided to try to do something about it.

Ohio is not an isolated situation. In Idaho this week, a rowdy group of protesters shattered a glass door and rushed the state House viewing gallery on the first day of a special session dedicated to the coronavirus. In Texas, a half-dozen county Republican parties censured Gov. Greg Abbott (R) last month for alleging overstepping his executive powers in ordering mask-wearing and other measures to contend with the state's surging number of coronavirus cases.



These idiots have lost their freaking minds.... I hope the voters put ALL of them into the unemployment lines in November.

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Lis

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8/26/2020, 2:30 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
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Re: Coronavirus


quote:

JustLis wrote:

I've done the Alaskan Inner Passage cruise on Princess twice. Only cruises I've ever taken. They were absolutely wonderful. But no, not right now.

I'm sorry you two missed out on your cruise hopes, too.



We weren't planning a cruise, Lis. Just a trip to Greece, with a week in Athens and nearby locations, a week on Corfu, and a week on the Peloponnese Peninsula to see places like Sparta, Olympia, etc. Greece has been at the top of my "bucket list" for several years.
8/28/2020, 5:25 pm Link to this post PM MsSusieQueue
 
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Re: Coronavirus


Oh, wow, Susie. I'm sorry I misunderstood. That sounds like a WONDERFUL trip! Let's hope there's a vaccine soon and your trip can commence!

---
Lis

Just one voice.... Singing in the darkness....
8/29/2020, 1:41 pm Link to this post PM JustLis
 
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Re: Coronavirus


Here’s how Joe Biden would combat the pandemic if he wins the election

By Yasmeen Abutaleb and Laurie McGinley
September 11, 2020

Joe Biden has created a war-cabinet-in-waiting on the coronavirus pandemic, with major figures from the Obama, Clinton and George H.W. Bush administrations drafting plans for distributing vaccines and personal protective gear, dramatically ramping up testing, reopening schools and addressing health-care disparities.

The effort began six months ago when the campaign consulted David Kessler, a former Food and Drug Administration commissioner under Presidents Bush and Bill Clinton, and Vivek H. Murthy, surgeon general under President Barack Obama, on how to run a presidential campaign during a pandemic.

The pair, along with a growing cadre of volunteer health experts, has been working behind the scenes to craft plans that could take effect Jan. 20, when the next president will take the oath of office, said Jake Sullivan, a senior policy adviser on the Biden campaign.

Biden has laid out a far more muscular federal approach than has President Trump. Biden would urge state and local leaders to implement mask mandates if they are still needed, create a panel on the model of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s War Production Board to boost testing, and lay out detailed plans to distribute vaccines to 330 million people after they are greenlighted as safe and effective.

By all accounts, the man who wins the Nov. 3 election will face a public health and economic crisis with little precedent. As of early September, the United States accounted for 4 percent of the world’s population but 23 percent of all coronavirus cases and 21 percent of deaths — a toll closing in on 200,000 and forecast to worsen significantly. Epidemiologists project a rise in cases and fatalities in late fall and winter as cold weather sends people indoors, students return to schools and colleges, and the pandemic converges with flu season.

Biden would have the federal government take the lead on many aspects of the response, from scaling up testing and contact tracing to setting strong national standards, drawing a contrast with Trump, who has ceded many of those matters to the states, with the federal government serving as a “backup” and “supplier of last resort.”

Immediately upon taking office, Biden would call Democratic and Republican governors and mayors across the country to ensure that not only does the federal government speak with one voice, but that Americans hear the same message from their state and local leaders, Sullivan said. He would urge state and local leaders to issue mandatory mask orders if necessary and to work together on a nationwide vaccination campaign.

Biden has also vowed to have public health experts and doctors hold regular news conferences on the pandemic.

Beginning in March, Kessler and Murthy prepared briefing documents of 80-plus pages that set the agenda, Kessler said. Biden peppered them with questions, several campaign aides said. How do you keep essential services going? How do you keep people safe? What kind of equipment do we need to provide for front-line workers and their families?

Among Biden’s first appointments would be a supply commander, who would evaluate persistent shortages in equipment and test supplies, including swabs and reagents, his aides said.

That person would have to be able to identify bottlenecks and shortages in the supply chain for every component of tests, protective equipment and other material — whether the fabric used in N95 masks or reagents for diagnostic tests.

“Lots of other countries have succeeded in controlling this, not because they have medicine we don’t, or a magic vaccine that we don’t,” Emanuel said. “They’ve been clear about the message, they’ve enforced it, and I think that’s what the future president is going to have to make clear to the American people — short-term pain for long-term gain.”

https://tinyurl.com/yxbtqyra
9/12/2020, 5:48 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Coronavirus


The stark contrast between Trump and Biden is illustrated clearly in this piece. Thanks for posting it, Belle. Human decency and competence are on the ballot in November.
9/12/2020, 6:37 am Link to this post PM bricklayer
 
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Re: Coronavirus


January 21 can't get here fast enough.

---
Robbie
9/12/2020, 10:11 am Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Re: Coronavirus


The schools here have been open for about three weeks and, lo and behold, the new infections have climbed from the mid two thousands to the mid three thousands. Numbers are trending upward. This is obviously a signal to our Governor that now is a good time to allow bars to reopen.

Last edited by bricklayer, 9/12/2020, 12:19 pm
9/12/2020, 12:15 pm Link to this post PM bricklayer
 
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Re: Coronavirus


quote:

bricklayer wrote:

The schools here have been open for about three weeks and, lo and behold, the new infections have climbed from the mid two thousands to the mid three thousands. Numbers are trending upward. This is obviously a signal to our Governor that now is a good time to allow bars to reopen.



How terribly sad, both that open schools are causing new infections to rise and that bars will reopen.

What compounds that sadness is that hoards of people, mostly young, will flock to the bars.

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Robbie
9/12/2020, 1:41 pm Link to this post PM Miz Robbie
 
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Re: Coronavirus


They don't call him Governor DeSatan for nothing.
9/12/2020, 6:22 pm Link to this post PM badhorsie
 
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Re: Coronavirus


Image
9/15/2020, 12:53 pm Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Coronavirus


Fauci hails Vt. virus response, expresses confidence about vaccine
By Greg Sukiennik, Bennington Banner
September 15, 2020

MONTPELIER — Dr. Anthony Fauci, the U.S. government's highest-ranking infectious disease expert, remains impressed by Vermont's response to the COVID-19 pandemic — and optimistic that a safe, effective vaccine is months away.

Appearing remotely in the first half-hour of Gov. Phil Scott's twice-weekly COVID-19 briefing on Tuesday, Fauci said he is confident that the vaccines for the virus now in advanced stage clinical trials will be released when they are medically and scientifically ready, without political pressure, and that there are enough layers of scrutiny to protect health and safety.

"I can tell, based on my experience and what I'm seeing, if there's a vaccine, which I'm fairly certain there will, be that is safe and effective, I for one would not hesitate to take it — nor would I hesitate to recommend that my entire family do it," Fauci said. He believes it likely that a vaccine could be ready by November or December, but more likely to be distributed in January or February.

There are six vaccines currently in trials, Fauci said, but he stressed that technical advances have allowed vaccine development that would have taken years to be completed in months. He also emphasized that there are multiple independent layers checking vaccines for safety and efficacy, as well as a pledge from the Food and Drug Administration that it will not rush approval of a vaccine unless it is proven safe and effective.

Finally, Fauci said, there is the scientific community — people like him "who very carefully look at that and are not shy about giving scientific opinions."

A member of President Donald Trump's Coronavirus Task Force, Fauci acknowledged Vermont's low population density makes it different from other states when considering its success in preventing community spread of the virus. But he also said that if other states could follow Vermont's lead, "we can not only get through the fall and the winter, we can come out on the other end better off than we went in."

Specifically, Fauci credited Vermont officials for sticking to fundamental principles that slow the spread of the virus, such as wearing masks, maintaining social distancing, and washing hands.

"Whether you are in Vermont or in New York City downtown, those things work. They work in states with small numbers like Vermont and they work in states with big numbers like New York, Texas and California," he said. "This should be the model for the country, notwithstanding that you're a small state. It should be the model of how you get to small test positivity."

Vermont's approach, Fauci said, is "what I have been trying very hard over the last several weeks and months to communicate to the nation about how we can actually open up economy, get our children back to schools, get people back to work in a safe, measured, prudent way."

But Fauci also cautioned that the road ahead will not be easy. COVID-19 is a tough opponent, he said, and does not care if you live in the country or the city.

"Even when you are in as good shape as Vermont is, you got into good shape by certain things you've done. Don't get careless," Fauci said. "Be prudent and careful in your interaction in the community."

Scott, in his introduction, acknowledged he is a "big fan" of Fauci.

"He's someone I've been so impressed with over the last six months," Scott said. "He tells it like it is and in a way most of us can understand."

Fauci has at times been targeted by Trump for contradicting Trump's optimistic predictions about the pandemic.

Last week, the news website Politico reported that emails showed an appointee reporting to Michael Caputo, the U.S. Health and Human Services assistant secretary for public affairs, had advised public affairs staff at the National Institutes of Health about what Fauci should tell reporters. A congressional subcommittee is investigating allegations that Caputo and others attempted to alter the CDC's weekly mortality and morbidity reports on the pandemic.

Fauci, who has served every president since Ronald Reagan, was asked to describe, in his experience, what a healthy relationship between government, politics and science should look like. He said it's hard to make such comparisons because the political and societal conditions and medical challenges vary greatly.

"It really depends in fairness to any given administration to the level of [political] divisiveness that there is in the society," Fauci said. "When you have everyone pulling together and you leave the kinds of decisions we're talking about to the scientists, and there's little disagreement one whatever side of the political spectrum you're on, things work very well," Fauci said .

But when the climate is more divisive, such as an election year, "it makes it much more difficult than other situations I have found myself in, such as the anthrax attacks following 9/11," Fauci said. "There was total unanimity in the country about what needed to be done."

The same was true when it came to HIV/AIDS, though there was a stigma associated with that virus at the time, Fauci said. "There was a universal push that ultimately led to a very very successful approach" with therapeutic drugs, he said.

Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) since 1984, has served as a top expert on HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases to six presidents. At NIAID, a wing of the National Institutes of Health, he has overseen research in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of HIV/AIDS, as well as existing illnesses such as tuberculosis and malaria and developing illnesses such as Ebola and Zika. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, by President George W. Bush in 2008.

---
Peter

"When it comes to humility, I'm the greatest." - Bullwinkle Moose
9/16/2020, 3:16 pm Link to this post PM streamline2001
 


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